BiomedMicrofluidics

Title Modelling and Optimization of Microfluidic Devices for Biomedical Applications

Project ID 303580

Call 31028580

Abstract Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are isolated tumor cells disseminated from the site of disease in metastatic or primary cancers, including breast, prostate, and lung cancer. CTCs can be identified and counted in the peripheral blood of patients. The biological analysis of CTCs using lab-on-chip technologies effectively diagnose the disease, determine personalized therapies, and adjust treatments in real time. This significantly increases the survival chance of the patients. Because of their rare occurrence, a few CTCs per 1 mL of blood, the CTCs must be isolated from the blood sample. Recent developments of microfluidic devices made a significant breakthrough in the detection and filtration of CTCs from blood. The aim of the project is to incorporate rigorous optimization techniques in the development of such devices. In the design process of currently manufactured devices, the focus has not been put on the performance optimization. The use of mathematically justified optimization techniques offers huge potential for increasing the efficiency. A computer tool for simulation of complex processes inside microfluidic devices will be developed. A novel capture mechanism based on local affinity interactions will be elaborated. An optimization framework will be established and implemented in the software. With this framework, new devices with higher efficiency will be designed. During the designing process, different concepts will be optimized, e.g. geometry, blood flow velocities, external magnetic fields manipulating ferromagnetic parts of the device, and other. The optimization will be carried out in a rigorous way by applying iterative optimization techniques, which is a novel element in the development of microfluidic devices. The underlying physical models will be properly calibrated and validated, and the simulation and the optimization methods will be mathematically justified.

Project objectives The aim of the project is the incorporation of optimization techniques in the development of microfluidic devices with biomedical applications. To achieve this, a robust computer tool for simulation of complex processes inside microfluidic devices must be developed. The computational core of the simulation tool will consist of the following basic components: fluid solver component, for which we use the Lattice-Boltzmann Method (LBM) and the immersed objects component, for which we use spring-network models of elastic objects. To capture important bio-mechanical aspects of cell adhesion, a third component will be developed, namely the adhesion component describing how a cell adheres to a functionalized surface. A suitable adhesion mechanism will be elaborated that is based on local affinity interactions. The well-balanced coupling between all three components will form a robust simulation tool. The underlying physical models will be properly calibrated and validated. 

Methodologies The modelling comprises three main components: the description of the fluid flow, the description of elastic objects and the description of adhesion processes. More details about the processes can be found on the site dedicated to the cell-in-fluid research site

Progress

 

events&news

04.04. 2017
New PhD positions

In our research group we open two PhD positions starting from September 2017. More information are available at dedicated page.

10.01. 2017
Invitation to a Workshop

Cell-in-fluid Research Group organizes the 2nd Workshop on Modelling of Biological Cells, Fluid Flow and Microfluidics - February 5-9, 2017. More information here.

10.05. 2016
New article published

The members of our group published an article in Journal of Computational Science (2015 Impact Factor 1.231). The title of the article is Simulation study of rare cell trajectories and capture rate in periodic obstacle arrays. Congratulate Martin, Iva, Renáta and Ivan.

08.04. 2016
New article published

Recently, new article has been published in Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering,  (Impact Factor 1.770). The title of the article is Collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays strongly depend on density of cell suspension. The article is available at journal website or at our publication section

08.01. 2016
New article published

Recently, new article has been published in International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering (Impact Factor 2.052). The title of the article is Non-uniform force allocation for area preservation in spring network models. The article is available at journal website or at our publication section. Congratulate Iveta and Ivan.

04.09. 2015
Welcome new colleagues

Starting in September, two doctoral students joined the group: Martin Slavik and Marek Kotus. Welcome!

26.08. 2015
PhD degree obtained

We congratulate Iveta on obtaining the PhD degree. Good luck (not only) in your further scientific research.

02.08. 2015
Conference in Edinburg

In July, Iveta and Martin B. attended the Discrete Simulation of Fluid Dynamics (DSFD2015) conference. They presented our preliminary results on analysis of periodic obstacle arrays.

15.10. 2014
ICNAAM

Our group participated at ICNAAM 2014 conference. I.Cimrák organized a symposium at the conference with title Modelling of Biological Cells, Fluid Flow and Microfluidics. 

05.09. 2014
New members in the group

Two new PhD students have joined our research group: Jana Kadlecová and Martina Bušík. Welcome :-)

2010-2017 © Cell-in-fluid, KST ŽUŽ - Všetky práva vyhradené. All right reserved.